Read Genesis 1 today. 

​Genesis 1:3-4, 10, 12, 17-18, 21, 25, 31 NIV
[3] And God said, “Let there be light,” and there was light. [4] God saw that the light was good, and he separated the light from the darkness.
[10] God called the dry ground “land,” and the gathered waters he called “seas.” And God saw that it was good.
[12] The land produced vegetation: plants bearing seed according to their kinds and trees bearing fruit with seed in it according to their kinds. And God saw that it was good.
[17] God set them in the vault of the sky to give light on the earth, [18] to govern the day and the night, and to separate light from darkness. And God saw that it was good.
[21] So God created the great creatures of the sea and every living thing with which the water teems and that moves about in it, according to their kinds, and every winged bird according to its kind. And God saw that it was good.
[25] God made the wild animals according to their kinds, the livestock according to their kinds, and all the creatures that move along the ground according to their kinds. And God saw that it was good.
[31] God saw all that he had made, and it was very good. And there was evening, and there was morning—the sixth day.
Throughout this chapter, we discover a number of things: the main character of the story is God; God’s assessment of creation was that it was good; and God’s assessment of creation changed from good to very good once human beings were introduced.
I know there are people who would argue against each, or perhaps all, of these points. I am not interested in entering into an argument. Rather, I suggest spending a few moments considering the implications of all three taken as a whole.
What does it mean if there is a creator who considers and values all of creation?
What does it mean if that creator’s assessment of everything within creation is that it is good?
What does it mean if that creator’s assessment changed from good to very good when human beings (you and me) are included?